Latino immigrants and the transformation of the U.S. South

Cover of: Latino immigrants and the transformation of the U.S. South |

Published by University of Georgia Press in Athens .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Latin Americans -- Southern States,
  • Hispanic Americans -- Southern States,
  • Immigrants -- Southern States -- Social conditions,
  • Alien labor, Latin American -- Southern States,
  • Latin America -- Emigration and immigration,
  • Southern States -- Emigration and immigration

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

Statementedited by Mary E. Odem and Elaine Lacy.
ContributionsOdem, Mary E., Lacy, Elaine Cantrell.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF220.S75 L363 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23147687M
ISBN 100820329681, 0820332127
ISBN 109780820329680, 9780820332123
LC Control Number2009001007

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Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South is an impressive book that addresses a contentious topic through a breadth of scholarly perspectives and sources. The use of in-depth ethnographies, focus groups, and interviews with undocumented workers adds a poignant and powerful component to some of the chapters.5/5(3).

This multidisciplinary collection of essays, written by U.S. and Mexican scholars, explores these transforma The Latino population in the South has more than doubled over the past decade/5.

The mass migration of Latin Americans to the U.S. South has led to profound changes in the social, economic, and cultural life of the region and inaugurated a new era in southern history.

This. Renée Daamen of the Department of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam reviews Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the US South. The book deals with the socio-political incorporation of Hispanic immigrants in non-traditional immigrant destinations in the American South.

Mexicans in California and Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South offer multidisciplinary articles that probe the impact of Latinos on the social, political, economic, and cultural life of the United States.

Both books make clear that this population is making us rethink what America is all : Ernesto Chávez. Summary This book features the American South, beyond black and white. The Latino population in the South has more than doubled over the past decade.

The mass migration of Latin Americans to the U.S. South has led to profound changes in the social, economic, and cultural life of the region and inaugurated a new era in southern history. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., - Political Science - pages 0 Reviews The degree to which the New South into which Hispanics are entering is a place of true transformation, adjustment and.

The editors, Elaine Lacy and Mary E. Odem, expanded the topic to encompass Latin American immigration to the United States South and this year published a collection of articles by 10 contributors in a book titled Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S.

South (University of Georgia Press, $). The key question addressed by Odem and Lacy throughout their book, Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South, is how the new wave of Latino immigrants is transforming the unique nature of the U.S. South as a region. Her current research project, Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S.

South (), addresses the socio-cultural contexts, processes, and transformations of Latin American migration to the US South since The project examines how diverse groups of migrants from Mexico and Central America have reconstructed community life and.

This essay explores the history of Latino immigration to the U.S. with particular emphasis on issues of citizenship and non-citizenship, political controversies over immigration policy, and the global economic context in which regional migration and immigration have occurred.

An Historic Overview of Latino Immigration and the Demographic Transformation of the United States.

Skip to main content. MENU. Search Browse; Resources. Authors; Librarians; Editors; Societies. The mass migration of Latin Americans to the U.S. South has led to profound changes in the social, economic, and cultural life of the region and inaugurated a new era in southern history.

This multidisciplinary collection of essays, written by U.S. and Mexican scholars, explores these transformations in rural, urban, and suburban areas of the South. Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South by Mary Odem. Our book is an exploration of the origins and consequences of the Latino invasion of Old South states between and The Latino population in the South has more than doubled over the past decade.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S.

South at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.5/5. Interpersonal Contexts: Social Support and Social Networks. Research on social support and social networks offers promising avenues to pursue that are relevant to Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health ().Given the expansive literature linking social networks to health, differences in social networks or levels of support may explain, for example, differential health profiles between.

Featuring first-person perspectives of Central and South Americans and Caribbean migrants, her books dramatically expand the popular conception of the U.S. Latino. As the emerging global city of the South, Atlanta has also witnessed a rapid influx of Latino immigrants.

Between andthe Latino population in the city grew by percent. In contrast, the Latino population in established areas such as Miami, Los Angeles, and New York grew only by, and 60 percent respectively. Recently, books about immigration have been a hot topic, thanks to Oprah choosing American Dirt for her book novel tells the story of a Mexican woman and her 8-year-old son, who must flee to the U.S.

after a local drug cartel guns down most of their family. U.S. Edition. LATINO VOICES 11/19/ pm ET "It's a book just as much about immigration and Latin culture as it is about family conflict and struggle.

I found it relatable to anyone, but also valuable because of the intimate glimpse it gives of the unique difficulties immigrants face with their identities." and provide a sense of. According to the U.S. census, the terms “Latino” and “Hispanic” represent the million who hail from a host of countries south of the U.S.

border and in the Caribbean, as well as Spain. Byaccording to the U.S. Census Bureau, that figure will jump to percent. As ofthe most recent figure, there were million Hispanic-owned businesses, a. 4 A growing share of Latino immigrants are longtime U.S.

residents. Nearly four-in-five Latino immigrants (78%) have lived in the U.S. for more than 10 years, up from 64% in Panamanian (88%) and Mexican (84%) immigrants have the highest shares on this measure. LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The Latin American Immigration Association is not affiliated with the USCIS or any government agency.

We are not a law firm. We are not a law firm. Information and training classes presented are not legal advice and do not substitute the advice, guidance or recommendations that a licensed attorney can provide. Now back to the U.S. for a significant, but often untold piece of our nation's history, how Latino Americans have shaped the country.

Our own Ray Suarez has written a book. Along the West Coast, East _____ remained in the s a magnet for Latino immigrants. Los Angeles Bythe amount of funds sent worldwide from the U.S.

was so great that it was surpassed in volume only by the currency flows of the global ________ trade. Over the centuries, many remarkable scientists have emerged from Spanish-speaking lands, cultures and ancestors.

Though grouping such a diverse collection of people under a single rubric -- particularly the politically expedient but dubious term Hispanic – isn't ideal, it does make room to explore their wide-ranging array of backgrounds and accomplishments.

Latinos in the United States are a diverse and fast-growing group that is amassing considerable economic and political power. As data from the Census and other sources demonstrate, Latinos now account for one-sixth of the U.S.

population. Most Latinos were born in this country, but over one-third are immigrants. Latinos as a whole (both foreign-born and native-born). He specializes in U.S. Latino theology and religion. His most recent books are Latino Catholicism: Transformation in America's Largest Church and Guadalupe and Her Faithful: Latino Catholics in San Antonio, from Colonial Origins to the Present.

He offers presentations and workshops on U.S. Catholicism and Latino ministry and theology throughout. If the history of Latino immigration to the U.S. proves right, immigrant Latino youth are here to stay. They will stay because many have U.S. citizenship and in contrast to their parents, who may continue to hold onto dreams of returning to their homelands one day, the U.S.

is their home. Find the latest Latino news articles, photos, and videos covering stories, issues and opinions of the Latino community on   The annual flow of legal immigrants would drop by aboutcloser to the level recommended by the s Commission on Immigration Reform chaired by former U.S.

Congresswoman Barbara Jordan. The risk of foreign-born terrorism on U.S. soil has also increased fears over the government’s vetting system for new immigrants and travelers, prompting President Trump to temporarily ban.

Hispanic Immigration And The United States Words | 4 Pages. Hispanic immigration to the United States stems primarily from uniquely developed push-pull migration mechanisms in which “interplay of national, regional, and global economic developments, the history of U.S.

military and foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, the checkered history of international border enforcement and. Byit is projected that the Hispanic population will reach the million mark, a significant factor in U.S.

population growth. As ofabout million families of Hispanic. However, U.S. black students were at the bottom of the list, after Greece, Turkey, and Mexico, and the increasingly numerous U.S. Hispanic students were fourth from the bottom, behind Greece.

When the three American groups were combined, the national total fell to points—twenty-first of thirty. Traditional Concerns of the Democratic Party. Finally, the proportion of Asian immigrants living below the federal poverty level is similar to that for U.S.-born populations (11 percent), whereas the proportion of Latin American immigrants is.

Hispanic/Latino Americans make up a diverse group that includes people of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South and Central American, and other Spanish cultures, and all races. Each has its own history and traditions, but all are more likely to have type 2 diabetes (17%) than non-Hispanic.

"Latino Americans," while necessarily limited to only the most seismic changes and largest groups in Latin American history, is an interesting, broad, challenging history of immigration and. Along with other Latinos — immigrants and U.S.

born — they have brought a Latin flavor to American shores. Florida Moving Image Archive Dreams of the Exiled. Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South - by Mary E Odem & Elaine Lacy (Paperback) $ undefined out of 5 stars with undefined reviews be the first!

be the first! ratingsPrice: $1 day ago  The failures of U.S. immigration policies Three new books challenge the way we imagine the U.S.-Mexico border. Sarah Tory Aug. 21, From the print edition. Infewer than half of eligible Latinos cast ballots, as the country elected a president who promised to a build a wall at the U.S.-Mexico border and repeatedly used Latin American immigrants.

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